ithildin
23 October 2011 @ 02:28 pm
The 1861 Project  
We've been watching Homeland, and I wondered what Damian Lewis's real voice sounded like, as I've only ever seen him on roles playing Americans. So along the way, we were at IMDB and saw a project he was involved in called 'To Appomattox', and then found the website. It sounds fascinating. Anyway, from there, I found The 1861 Project, The 1861 Project begins as a collection of original songs that imagine the stories of the real people who fought and lived through the Civil War.... I've downloaded the first volume, 'From Farmer to Foot Soldier', and it's excellent I'm looking forward to future volumes.
 
 
ithildin
23 October 2011 @ 02:28 pm
The 1861 Project  
We've been watching Homeland, and I wondered what Damian Lewis's real voice sounded like, as I've only ever seen him on roles playing Americans. So along the way, we were at IMDB and saw a project he was involved in called 'To Appomattox', and then found the website. It sounds fascinating. Anyway, from there, I found The 1861 Project, The 1861 Project begins as a collection of original songs that imagine the stories of the real people who fought and lived through the Civil War.... I've downloaded the first volume, 'From Farmer to Foot Soldier', and it's excellent I'm looking forward to future volumes.
 
 
ithildin
23 October 2011 @ 02:28 pm
The 1861 Project  
We've been watching Homeland, and I wondered what Damian Lewis's real voice sounded like, as I've only ever seen him on roles playing Americans. So along the way, we were at IMDB and saw a project he was involved in called 'To Appomattox', and then found the website. It sounds fascinating. Anyway, from there, I found The 1861 Project, The 1861 Project begins as a collection of original songs that imagine the stories of the real people who fought and lived through the Civil War.... I've downloaded the first volume, 'From Farmer to Foot Soldier', and it's excellent I'm looking forward to future volumes.
 
 
ithildin
22 April 2011 @ 06:49 pm
Fancy Dishes and Kitchen Commonplaces  
I subscribe to the Common-Place newsletter, and the newest issue contains Fancy Dishes and Kitchen Commonplaces

"The following recipes have been extracted from assorted cookbooks published during the Age of Experiment. Most recipes predating 1840 were designed for hearthside cookery; those post-1840, for cookstove preparation. As you will see, they are facsimiles, reprinted here exactly as they were written for nineteenth-century cooks. The challenge and pleasure of updating them for the twenty-first century kitchen are yours. Bon appétit!"
 
 
ithildin
22 April 2011 @ 06:49 pm
Fancy Dishes and Kitchen Commonplaces  
I subscribe to the Common-Place newsletter, and the newest issue contains Fancy Dishes and Kitchen Commonplaces

"The following recipes have been extracted from assorted cookbooks published during the Age of Experiment. Most recipes predating 1840 were designed for hearthside cookery; those post-1840, for cookstove preparation. As you will see, they are facsimiles, reprinted here exactly as they were written for nineteenth-century cooks. The challenge and pleasure of updating them for the twenty-first century kitchen are yours. Bon appétit!"
 
 
ithildin
22 April 2011 @ 06:49 pm
Fancy Dishes and Kitchen Commonplaces  
I subscribe to the Common-Place newsletter, and the newest issue contains Fancy Dishes and Kitchen Commonplaces

"The following recipes have been extracted from assorted cookbooks published during the Age of Experiment. Most recipes predating 1840 were designed for hearthside cookery; those post-1840, for cookstove preparation. As you will see, they are facsimiles, reprinted here exactly as they were written for nineteenth-century cooks. The challenge and pleasure of updating them for the twenty-first century kitchen are yours. Bon appétit!"
 
 
ithildin
17 April 2011 @ 06:19 pm
Touching the Past  
When I was a little girl, I used to listen enrapt, to stories of the Great 1906 Earthquake. The mother-in-law of the owner of the hotel my father was resident manager of, had been a girl in 1906 and had lived through the earthquake, and some days, I would go up to her apartment for tea and stories. Too bad I was too little to quite realize I was touching history. So this account, recently discovered, of a young woman's experience during those dark days held special meaning for me.

Leonie von Zesch, the daughter of a German countess, graduated in 1902 at age 19 from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, San Francisco, and built a thriving dental practice in the city prior to the great quake and fires of 1906. Among the typewritten pages bequeathed to her niece was a description of the disaster as it eerily unfolded around her. She would lose almost everything, including her home and office.
 
 
ithildin
17 April 2011 @ 06:19 pm
Touching the Past  
When I was a little girl, I used to listen enrapt, to stories of the Great 1906 Earthquake. The mother-in-law of the owner of the hotel my father was resident manager of, had been a girl in 1906 and had lived through the earthquake, and some days, I would go up to her apartment for tea and stories. Too bad I was too little to quite realize I was touching history. So this account, recently discovered, of a young woman's experience during those dark days held special meaning for me.

Leonie von Zesch, the daughter of a German countess, graduated in 1902 at age 19 from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, San Francisco, and built a thriving dental practice in the city prior to the great quake and fires of 1906. Among the typewritten pages bequeathed to her niece was a description of the disaster as it eerily unfolded around her. She would lose almost everything, including her home and office.
 
 
ithildin
17 April 2011 @ 06:19 pm
Touching the Past  
When I was a little girl, I used to listen enrapt, to stories of the Great 1906 Earthquake. The mother-in-law of the owner of the hotel my father was resident manager of, had been a girl in 1906 and had lived through the earthquake, and some days, I would go up to her apartment for tea and stories. Too bad I was too little to quite realize I was touching history. So this account, recently discovered, of a young woman's experience during those dark days held special meaning for me.

Leonie von Zesch, the daughter of a German countess, graduated in 1902 at age 19 from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, San Francisco, and built a thriving dental practice in the city prior to the great quake and fires of 1906. Among the typewritten pages bequeathed to her niece was a description of the disaster as it eerily unfolded around her. She would lose almost everything, including her home and office.
 
 
ithildin
06 March 2011 @ 12:38 pm
Westerns Are Back  
At least according to this article. I guess Firefly was just ahead of its time :( And Magnificent Seven as well, I suppose.
 
 
ithildin
06 March 2011 @ 12:38 pm
Westerns Are Back  
At least according to this article. I guess Firefly was just ahead of its time :( And Magnificent Seven as well, I suppose.
 
 
ithildin
06 March 2011 @ 12:38 pm
Westerns Are Back  
At least according to this article. I guess Firefly was just ahead of its time :( And Magnificent Seven as well, I suppose.
 
 
 
 
 
ithildin
30 January 2010 @ 11:45 am
150  
"Robin Dunbar, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at Oxford University, developed a theory in the 1990s dubbed Dunbar's Number. The theory contends that the human brain is only capable of managing relationships--staying in contact at least once per year and knowing how friends relate to others--with about 150 people."

Sorry, Facebook friends: Our brains can't keep up
 
 
ithildin
30 January 2010 @ 11:45 am
150  
"Robin Dunbar, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at Oxford University, developed a theory in the 1990s dubbed Dunbar's Number. The theory contends that the human brain is only capable of managing relationships--staying in contact at least once per year and knowing how friends relate to others--with about 150 people."

Sorry, Facebook friends: Our brains can't keep up
 
 
ithildin
30 January 2010 @ 11:45 am
150  
"Robin Dunbar, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at Oxford University, developed a theory in the 1990s dubbed Dunbar's Number. The theory contends that the human brain is only capable of managing relationships--staying in contact at least once per year and knowing how friends relate to others--with about 150 people."

Sorry, Facebook friends: Our brains can't keep up
 
 
ithildin
03 January 2010 @ 03:04 pm
A Visit to a Steampunked Home  
This is pretty nifty! I especially love the kitchen.
 
 
ithildin
03 January 2010 @ 03:04 pm
A Visit to a Steampunked Home  
This is pretty nifty! I especially love the kitchen.